Potomac Headwaters Leaders of Watersheds

Students are learning by doing and leading by example to protect rivers and watersheds using science and education.

PHLOW.  Potomac Headwaters Leaders of Watersheds began in 2008 as a partnership with the WV Corporation for National and Community Service.  PHLOW has had many supporters including the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, WV DEP, Potomac Watershed Partnership, and Chesapeake Bay Program.  PHLOW has spread from its WV base and now includes schools in W.MD, and the Shenandoah Valley.  (More on the History of PHLOW.)

PHLOW teaches students that hands-on conservation of local watersheds can provide significant environment benefit.  Schools have three program choices: Growing Native, Grow-a-Garden, and Plant-a-Tree.  Students learn through doing and are empowered to lead hands-on conservation at their school.

PHLOW is building future generations of watershed stewards and is engaging thousands of students every year.  (See Hands-on Projects here.)

PHLOW Goals:

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Teach future stewards what they can do to reduce non-point source water pollution

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Design and install rain gardens, micro-nurseries, and plant trees at schools  

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 Increase watershed awareness in the broader community

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Demonstrate that students can make a difference in their school and community

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Foster the importance of clean rivers for future generations

 

 

Growing Native

Grow a Garden

Plant a Tree

Lessons

Watersheds 101– What are they and do I live in one?

Trees Inside and Out- What is the role of each part of the tree?

Tree Characteristics- Discover how to identify native tree species

Pollution Buffers- How do trees reduce pollution?

(NOTE:  The four lessons/sessions are the same in spring OR fall.  The PROGRAM difference is that fall is seeds in a temporary station and spring is planting “tree whips” in a semi-permanent “caged” Grow-out Station.)

Watersheds– What are they and do I live in one?

Nutrient and Sediment Pollution– Exam­ining how they are harmful to rivers

Benthic Macroinvertebrates– What are they?  What do they tell us about the health of our Rivers?

Rain Gardens and Native Plants– What are they and how do they reduce pollution?

(NOTE:  The lessons are the same.  Grow a Garden can be in spring OR fall.)

Importance of Trees:  Age appropriate lesson on why trees are essential to our environment and provide food and shelter for both humans and animals.

Structure - Explore the essential functions of each part of the tree through an interactive lesson.

(NOTE:  Plant a Tree can be done in spring OR fall.  It is better for the tree to plant in the fall but school schedules may be better for spring planting.  Schools can do one OR the other but we ask schools only have one program per year.)

LESSON PLANS HERE

Growing Native Lesson Plan (14 MB)

Grow-a-Garden Lesson Plan (24 MB)

Plant-a-Tree Lesson Plan  (0.5 MB)

Program

(fall)

·         Four 50 minute sessions

·         One end of the year follow-up session

·         Students collect seeds independently

·         Students plant the seeds in a temporary Grow-out Station for propagation (materials provided)

·         Four 50 minute sessions

·         Install & plant rain garden mid-October (heavy work & materials provided)

·         One 50 minute session

·         Assist in development of planting plan and mark locations for trees

·         Plant trees by classes (trees and materials provided)

Program

(spring)

·         Four 50 minute sessions

·         Students pot “tree whips” (2 year old seedlings) in a semi-permanent “caged” Grow-out Station (materials provided)

·         Four 50 minute sessions

·         Install & plant the rain garden mid-April- June 1st  (heavy work and materials provided)

·         One 50 minute session

·         Assist in development of planting plan and mark locations for trees

·         Plant trees by classes (trees and materials provided)

School

Respons-ibilities

·         Set aside time and secure volunteer help on the planting days

·         Setting up a semi-permanent or temporary Grow-out Station at the school.

·         Water and maintain the trees (caged stations will have automated watering systems for summer.)

·         Set aside time and secure volunteer help on the planting days.

·         Choose a permanent location for the rain garden.

·         Water and maintain the garden.

·         Set aside time and secure volunteer help on the planting days.

·         Transport trees to school from holding area in WV

·         Choose locations for the trees.

·         Contact Miss Utility

·         Dig holes prior to planting day

·         Water and maintain the trees.

APPLY

HERE

Growing Native

More Information and Application

Grow-a-Garden

More Information and Application

Plant-a-Tree

More Information and Application

For more information, contact CI's PHLOW staff.

 

     

Cacapon Institute - From the Cacapon to the Potomac to the Chesapeake Bay, we protect rivers and watersheds using science and education.

Cacapon Institute
#10 Rock Ford Road
Great Cacapon, WV 25422
304-258-8013 (tele)

Click here to send us an email
Frank Rodgers,  Executive Director

Website  made possible by funding from The Norcross Wildlife Foundation,  the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Virginia Environmental Endowment, NOAA-BWET, USEPA, The MARPAT Foundation, and our generous members.